NoRILLA

NoRILLA is a patent-pending mixed-reality educational system bridging physical and virtual worlds to improve STEM learning.

Our goal is to create a new education system that fosters curiosity, creativity and helps children find answers to the questions in their minds.

NESRA YANNIER, CEO

She is a postdoctoral researcher of Human-Computer Interaction Institute at Carnegie Mellon University and founded NoRILLA with her advisors, Scott Hudson and Ken Koedinger

I worked on software development for the game and the implementation of computer vision techniques to enable object recognition and object motion detection, hardware setup for Kinect camera and AC motor, and physical model prototyping.

Our team has demontrated our project at multiple occasions such as educational events, schools, a science center, and a children's museum.

EXHIBITIONS AND DEMONSTRATIONS

Carnegie Mellon University 50th Anniversary Founders Exposition
UPMC Passavant Hospital Bright Horizon Daycare Center
CMU HCII Demo Day 2017
Alphalab and Alphalab Gear Demo Day 2017
Carnegie Science Center
Remake Learning Days
Maker Faire Pittsburgh 2016
Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh
IKEA Pittsburgh

MEDIA

After I joined the team

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Startups target underserved communities at AlphaLab's 2017 Demo Day
Getting Smart, Montour Schools: Home of the Evolving Educators

Before I joined the team

KQED News, What Kids Can Learn When Blocks Get a Tech Boost
Hechinger Report, Can Children Learn From a “Mixed-reality” Game?
TribLive, CMU PostDoc's Play Table For Children Balances Virtual, Physical Worlds
Human Computer Interaction Institute, Student Spotlight: Ph.D. Candidate Nesra Yannier
Remake Learning, New EDTech Fund Forges Vital Ties Between Developers and Teachers
Education Week, Effective Digital Learning Games Blend the Virtual and the Real, Study Finds
Futurity, Why Tablets Can’t Replace ‘Real World’ in Schools
The Journal, Research: Young Students Learn Better with Mix of Virtual and Real Worlds
Silicon Angle, Educational Games are More Effective When They’re Hands-on, Study Finds
Microsoft Developer, Kinect Sensor Helps Facilitate Learning

This project is patent-pending and all technical information is confidential. For more information, please send me request at youngwookdo@gatech.edu.

COPYRIGHT @ YOUNGWOOKDO 2017